Multiemployer Pension Plans

We have been monitoring and reporting on several disquieting events which have occurred in the multi-employer pension plan world within the past few months.

In September 2015, the Central States Southeast and Southwest Area Pension Fund availed itself of the relief permitted under the Kline-Miller Multiemployer Pension Reform Act of 2014 (“Kline-Miller Act”) by applying

The United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (“UFCW”) National Pension Fund (which, according to its website has over 500 contributing employers and over 100,000 active participants) has adopted a new rule effective as of the plan year ending on June 30, 2014 which increases the risk that a participating employer will unknowingly create a

Both buyers and sellers in asset sale transactions should be cognizant of the ongoing erosion of the common law rule that the purchaser is not responsible for the seller’s liabilities absent a contractual assumption of such liabilities, as evidenced by a recent Ninth Circuit case finding that the theory of successor liability may be used

The Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an Exposure Draft (the “Draft”) September 1, 2010, proposing changes to U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”), which, if adopted, would require participating employers in multiemployer pension plans to disclose in their financial statements additional information concerning their obligations to such plans. The Draft would apply to public companies for fiscal years ending after December 15, 2010 and to non-public companies exactly one year later.
Continue Reading FASB Draft Would Require Additional Financial Statement Disclosure of Liabilities of Multiemployer Plans

The Pension Protection Act of 2006 (“PPA”) created certain funding classifications for multiemployer pension plans. Seriously underfunded plans are classified as either “critical” (“red zone”) or endangered (“yellow zone”). Plans that fall in between these two levels are considered “seriously endangered” (“orange zone”) plans. Such plans must send participating employers a notice about the plan’s